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Purple-bearded Bee-eater - BirdForum Opus

Revision as of 08:01, 27 July 2023 by THEFERN-13145 (talk | contribs) (→‎Distribution)
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Photo by Rob Hutchinson
Location: Gunang Ambang,Sulawesi,Indonesia

Alternative name: Celebes Bee-eater

Meropogon forsteni

Identification

25-26 cm (10 inches) long, plus 6 cm (21/2 inches) of tail streamers.

  • head, face, breast and upper belly purple
  • may appear to have a darker eye mask depending on light
  • throat with long hanging feathers (the "beard")
  • nape red-brown
  • upperparts, wings and upper tail are mid to dark green
  • tail long
  • undertail brownish
  • bill long, downturned, black
  • call is a quiet high-pitched szit or peep

Female is similar with a red-brown belly. Juveniles have a green crown and nape, blue beard and dusky face. They do not have the long tail feathers.

Distribution

Pair. Photo © by THE_FERN. Gunung Ambang, Sulawesi Indonesia, July 2023

Sulawesi endemic. South East Asia: Indonesia: Greater Sundas.

Taxonomy

The Purple-bearded Bee-eater is a near passerine bird in the bee-eater family Meropidae. It's the only member of the genus Meropogon. Its scientific name commemorates Eltio Alegondas Forsten (1811-1843) who collected in the East Indies between 1838 and his death.

Habitat

Dense forest.

Behaviour

This bird breeds inland during the dry season and moves to the coast in the rainy season. It makes its nests in burrows in riverbanks and cliffs. It does not form colonies. The diet includes insects, including bees, wasps and dragonflies and beetles, which are caught in flight.

External Links

GSearch checked for 2020 platform.1

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